Arts & Culture

Political Art on Stage in Manhattan as 2018 Opens

After Uma Thurman's witty and provocative Broadway performance last night as The Parisian Woman, my seatmate to the left remarked, "it's good to see this again." He was a Millennial in this all-ages globally mixed crowd in a sold-out house on a bitter cold winter evening. Political art is making a comeback on stage, screen and in museums. Inspired by the 19th century farce La Parisienne and written by Beau Willimon (who premiered Netflix' House of Cards' adaptation in 2016), the 90-minute play illuminates the shameless manipulation of an ambitious Washington, D.C., socialite set on a plum appointment for her... Read more →


Miami Will Always Be 'Magic City'

Miami is constantly reinventing itself, and over the past year, I discovered that Coconut Grove - hip and cool 30 years ago, then declasse and "tired," has been remaking itself in the classic "boom-bust-and-boom" Miami┬ástyle. Its funky, artsy personality remains as glass-wrapped high rises line up along South Bayshore Drive. Here's more of what to find today in Miami. Read more →


Treatises on Fashion at The Met Museum - Comme des Garcons and Irving Penn

If you think of designer Rei Kawakubo's current exhibit at the Met ("Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garcons: Art of the 'In-Between'") as a commentary on life, it's a lot more palatable than thinking of the clothes as something you'd run out in for the evening. (Well, some do - keep reading.) Not to be missed either is the Irving Penn retrospective (Irving Penn: Centennial), more than 150 photos representing all his genres, including his elegant fashion photography for Vogue. You might call this the polar opposite of Kawakubo's imagination. Read more →


Independent Book Stores - Dive in for Summer Reading

National Independent Bookstore Day the last weekend in April is a regular reminder that indie bookstores are travel destinations And why not? Writer Ann Patchett, who owns the Nashville, Tennessee Parnassus Books I've visited, wrote about this eloquently in the recent special New York Times Travel section on bookstores. (There are several fascinating articles in this special section of Dec. 6, 2016 about literary adventures and bookstore destinations, starting with Ann Patchett's personal guide of favorites. Additionally the National Independent Bookstore Day link provides a long list of some but not all indie bookstores around the U.S.) When I'm on... Read more →


40th Anniversary of The Last Waltz - Interview with Robbie Robertson

Testimony, the memoir by The Band's guitarist and principal songwriter Robbie Robertson, ends with The Last Waltz, the group's final concert in 1976 and often called "the end of an era" for the melange of rock, blues and folk that fueled the '60s and '70s. Forever etched in memory as the pulsating, doe-eyed virtuoso guitarist in the magenta scarf that iconic evening, which was captured on film by Martin Scorsese, Robbie Robertson drew several hundred aging rockers and younger people to Dominican University just 25 miles north of San Francisco's Winterland, where the The Last Waltz was performed. Read more →


Editor Terry McDonell on a Lifetime of Writing - and Writers

Terry McDonell, author of the new memoir, The Accidental Life, has edited some of the best writers of our generation -- and likely some of them are better because of him. Yet he opened his remarks at the independent bookstore Book Passage in Marin County, California with a confession - "I could not get a good job as a writer, so I began to tumble my way into editing jobs." Read more →